Wednesday, September 5, 2018

IWSG - A Writer's Fork in the Road of Publishing


It's IWSG time!

Every month on the first Wednesday of the month, us writers come together to offer support, advice, encouragement or simply to shed our frustrations and woes with each other. Writing is a tough journey, and we don't have to go it alone.

Thanks goes to the brain behind this group, Alex J. Cavanaugh! If you want to join in or find out more (because there is so much more to this group) then head on over here.

Special thanks goes to this month's co-hosts:  Toi Thomas, T. Powell Coltrin, M.J. Fifield, and Tara Tyler!  Thanks guys!


This month's question is...

What publishing path are you considering/did you take, and why?


I'm more of a traditional type of girl, and that's the path I decided to take. At least, that's the easy answer, but when in life are things that easy? This was a path that didn't happen overnight either.

Many of my author friends are self-published, and this is a path I will probably also embark on someday. Just not quite yet. Even then, I'm thinking I'd rather be a mixed author and continue with both (if possible). 

But here are the reasons I chose the other path for now (ready for the list?):

1) Middle Grade literature is a tough cookie in self-publishing. (This is by far the most important point in my decision). While YA and adult literature can run well or at least somewhat decently in the self-publishing world, children's literature isn't quite as marketable. There are various reasons for this, which I'm not going into right now. Seven or eight years ago, authors insisted that children's literature just needed to gain footing, but it never happened. Not really. I do know some self-publishers who have done all right...very few...but it's still a battle for them, and I've seen many of them give up and switch over to YA instead. 

2) Not alone. Honestly, publishing and marketing are new adventures I didn't want to have to learn on my own yet. My life is pretty busy as it is, and I'm constantly having to learn things from scratch. Let's just say it's nice to have some assistance in at least one area of life rather than tackle that alone too.

3) Verification.  It was important to me to bring my writing to the point where others would stand behind it too. What can I say? Even I have personal dreams and goals.


But, as said, this doesn't mean I wouldn't switch paths or use both in the future. I'm always ready to go with the flow.


What about you? Which route do you want to take or have you taken?

*****


And on the happy news end of things...

One of my super-duper writing buddies has her cover reveal today! YAY!!!!






This is a paranormal retelling of Hansel and Gretel....and what a read it is! I was lucky enough to receive an ARC copy from Krystal, and....
WOW...
I'm loving every page.
She has a slightly dark twists on things and it definitely draws in.
Anyway, click the cover to head on over and see it on my blog, Bookworm for Kids.

******

I almost forgot!!!!

Today is the first day of open submissions for the latest IWSG Anthology!



Genre: Young Adult Romance
Word Count: 3500-5000
Theme: Masquerade
A masquerade can be a false show or pretense, someone pretending to be someone they aren't. It can be a ball, a fancy dress party, it can be a mask. Open to interpretation.

Submissions accepted: September 5 - November 4, 2018

How to enter: Send your polished, formatted (Double spaced, no page numbers), previously unpublished story to admin @ insecurewriterssupportgroup.com before the deadline passes. Please include your contact details, your social links, and if you are part of the Blogging, Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter IWSG group.

Judging: The IWSG admins will create a shortlist of the best stories. The shortlist will then be sent to our official judges who will be announced.

Prizes: The winning stories will be edited and published by Freedom Fox Press next year in the IWSG anthology. Authors will receive royalties on books sold, both print and eBook. The top story will have the honor of giving the anthology its title.



Are you joining in?

39 comments:

  1. I'm happy I went with a publisher. Once you get some experience, then you can branch out.

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  2. I hear you. For MG or picture books, it only makes sense to go with a traditional publisher. I've seen people try with self publishing too, and it's such a beast. They just can't get the books into the hands of kids, and little ones need tangible books--which means print copies. My MGers get headaches from reading digital books. It just goes to show, there's no one answer for everyone, eh?

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    1. Kids need to touch and hold. Lol! So do I often.

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  3. MG is tough in the self-publishing world. I bet you're learning a lot with a publisher, and if they're treating you right, that's awesome. I know what you mean about verification. I use short stories to fulfill that in me. Have a great week! :)

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    1. Short stories are awesome for that. And they're more quickly written too.

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  4. Ooh, I love the theme for the anthology! I think eventually it'll be easier to market kid's books, but so many kids discover books in school book fairs and libraries. Not everyone has parents like mine who encouraged a lot of reading.

    I'm glad you're enjoying the book so far! ^_^

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    1. There are tons of laws surrounding the marketing on social media for kids, which make it much harder on that end too. You were a lucky girl :)

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  5. I can see why you'd want to seek out a publisher for MG. The great thing about publishing nowadays is that we do have choices. We're not stuck to just one path. :)

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  6. It makes sense that traditional publishing would be the way to go with MG. I love that there's choices available these days and that everyone can choose the path that suits them best.

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  7. I've self-published three MG. They don't bring in much of anything, but at least I got them out there as the traditional route was taking so long and I'm getting to old to wait.

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    1. Good for you! I only have the highest respect for children book authors who go that route.

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  8. I like being a hybrid author, so I understand how you might go both ways in this business. Good luck with whatever you choose.

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    1. Different stories have different needs. And I bet you've learned a lot in the process.

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  9. MG is certainly harder to self-publish and market effectively. With children's books, you're really selling to parents, teachers, librarians... The kids are sometimes making their decisions themselves, but they're largely influenced by what teachers and parents suggest or literally hand to them. So you not only have to write something the reader will like, but something the adults around the reader will see value in as well!

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    Replies
    1. That's exactly it. Adding history, science or other solid information to the mix, definitely could help out in this area too.

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  10. Yeah, children's books don't do well on self-publishing platforms. I mean, my nieces are 10 and 8 and they love to read--but they always read actual books, not ebooks. That would involve their parents and them vetting what they read electronically. Plus, I think kids like the feel of a book in their hands.

    I like being a hybrid author--it was nice to know that I didn't have to worry about everything just pieces of it when I was published in an anthology last year.

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    1. Hybrid allows so much flexibility...the best of both worlds.

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  11. A lot of authors are hybrids now-a-days. I can see why. It's a smart move to be that flexible and able to publish the book the way you think is best to get it to readers.

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    Replies
    1. Every story is different, and it's great that each one can be treated that way.

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  12. Hybrid is a great way to go - a little taste of both worlds.
    Love Krystal's cover!

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  13. Great cover!
    I'm a traditionally published author, too, but I think there are different paths for different circumstances and goals.

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  14. I did the same for creds and to learn. Lots to know if you want to do it right. :-)

    Anna from elements of emaginette

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    1. Writing and editing a story is only the beginning.

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  15. It is harder with MG when it comes to indie publisher. I'm hoping that will change over time, though.

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    Replies
    1. It would be nice. Who knows what the future will bring.

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  16. I'm a traditional type of girl, too. I find I like that support. I don't want to do it all on my own, though I have self-published a short story and may do more. And I am helping my mom to self-publish her picture books. Children's is so hard to do as an indie author, but also so tough to break into traditionally. *sigh*

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  17. Sounds like great reasoning to me! I’m doing hybrid. A little of both worlds keeps things interesting.

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  18. I really like all the reasons you listed, especially your research in children's and middle grade competitions. I am a YA girl myself and hope to one day score an agent. Crystal's book looks great!

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  19. I think you've made a well-considered decision. I'm a trad kind of girl, too, because I think I'll need some support for the sort of books I write.

    I might go indie once I'm more sure of myself. All the best for your writing this month!


    Damyanti at Daily (w)rite

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  20. Sounds reasonable to me! Best of luck with it!!

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  21. I'm a self publisher. I'd like to try traditional someday. I can only imagine that middle grade would be something very difficult to try and self publish! I wish you the best of luck when and if you choose self publishing!

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  22. Valid reasons. I didn't know that about MG/children's. I also want that validation of having a publisher want my book.

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  23. I totally agree with you, basically for the same reasons. I, too would do both, but after I make a name for myself traditionally. The journey goes on... lol

    All the best in yours!

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  24. Keeping your options open is definitely the best way to go. Just because you start in one camp doesn't mean you can't wind up in the other later.

    One of the reasons I decided not to write middle grade was because I knew I'd have to go traditionally published to gain any traction at all.

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